Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch on sale for 100 mln dlrs

(AGI) Washington, May 29 - Neverland Ranch, the estate that the"King of Pop" Michael Jackson purchased in 1988 in SantaBarbera, Calfornia, 150 km north of Los Angeles, for 20 milliondollars and converted into a theme park, will be put on salefor 100 million dollars, reported the Wall Street Journal onFriday. The estate, which extends over 2,700 hectares,once comprised a zoo, 22 buildings, including a mansion, anamusement park, a railroad with a station, a theatre, a cinematheatre, a pool, tennis and basketball courts and huge gardens.Michael Jackson named it Neverland to honour

(AGI) Washington, May 29 - Neverland Ranch, the estate that the"King of Pop" Michael Jackson purchased in 1988 in SantaBarbera, Calfornia, 150 km north of Los Angeles, for 20 milliondollars and converted into a theme park, will be put on salefor 100 million dollars, reported the Wall Street Journal onFriday. The estate, which extends over 2,700 hectares,once comprised a zoo, 22 buildings, including a mansion, anamusement park, a railroad with a station, a theatre, a cinematheatre, a pool, tennis and basketball courts and huge gardens.Michael Jackson named it Neverland to honour the realm of PeterPan, an imaginary place where no one grows up or gets older.Jackson used it to entertain his guests, many of whom werechildren. In 1993 and in 2003, the singer was accused ofabusing some of the youths invited to Neverland although thecharges were never proven and the pop star was finallyacquitted after several trials in 2005. His young friendscontinued to visit Neverland through the duration of thetrials. After that date, the singer moved his residence toBahrein until he died in 2007. In 2008 the property was sold toa hotel company in which Michael Jackson held a stake. It wasrebaptised Sycamore Valley Ranch and many of the facilitiesbuilt by Jackson were torn down. Now an investment company hascommissioned several real-estate agents to sell the property ata price of 100 million dollars, said the Wall Street Journal,and to find a buyer who will not convert it into a museum. "Wewon't allow guided tours," the real-estate agents assured thenewspaper. (AGI) . .