'I am a peregrine of peace', says Pope in Sarajevo

(AGI) Sarajevo, June 6 - The Pope, defying the muscle-showingof local authorities in upgrading the security systems,including helicopters with open doors and riflemen ready toshoot, embraced people in the streets, letting them touch him,and talked to them. This was easily seen when he entered theCathedral, where it took him several minutes to reach the altarbecause of the many stops he made on the way, where he stoppedto listen to people, embracing and kissing them. The same alsohappened in his other stops during his extraordinary day inSarajevo, starting from the airport, where

(AGI) Sarajevo, June 6 - The Pope, defying the muscle-showingof local authorities in upgrading the security systems,including helicopters with open doors and riflemen ready toshoot, embraced people in the streets, letting them touch him,and talked to them. This was easily seen when he entered theCathedral, where it took him several minutes to reach the altarbecause of the many stops he made on the way, where he stoppedto listen to people, embracing and kissing them. The same alsohappened in his other stops during his extraordinary day inSarajevo, starting from the airport, where he met a group ofyoungsters, that he later mentioned in his address to thepresident, with a very touching addition. "These initiativesoffer a witness to the entire world that such cooperation amongvarying ethnic groups and religions in view of the common goodis possible...I saw this hope today in those children who Igreeted at the airport: Muslims, Orthodox, Jews, Catholics,other minorities, all together and joyful. That is hope. Let usbet on that," the Pope said. "This city, which in therecent past sadly became a symbol of war and destruction,today, with its variety of peoples, cultures and religions, canbecome again a sign of unity, a place in which diversity doesnot represent a threat but rather a resource, an opportunity togrow together," the Pope said. The city is located in anatypical country of the Old Continent which should beintegrated into the European Union, said the Pope. ThePope continued: "In order to successfully oppose the barbarityof those who would make of every difference the occasion andpretext for further unspeakable violence, we need to recognizethe fundamental values of human communities, values in the nameof which we can and must cooperate, build and dialogue, pardonand grow; this will allow different voices to unite in creatinga melody of sublime nobility and beauty, instead of thefanatical cries of hatred." In Bosnia, the Pope observed:"Responsible politicians are called to the important task ofbeing the first servants of their communities, taking actionswhich safeguard above all the fundamental rights of the humanperson, among which the right to religious freedom stands out."Pope Francis said he was "a pilgrim of peace and dialogue" andlaunched a message from Bosnia: affirm that it is possible tolive one alongside the other, "where diversity does notrepresent a threat but rather a resource and an opportunity togrow together in peace and harmony," he said. The Popeconcluded: "Bosnia and Herzegovina is indeed an integral partof Europe, the successes and tragic experiences of the formerare integrated fully into the latter's history of successes andtragedies. They constitute, too, a clear call to pursue everyavenue of peace, in order that processes already underway canbe yet more resilient and binding." . .