FIFA opens post-Blatter era after FBI investigations

(AGI) Rome, June 3 - FIFA has opened the post-Blatter era insearch of his successor. The day after the FIFA presidentannounced his resignation, even though he intends to remain inoffice until the end of the year, new candidacies have beenproposed: Arthur Antunes Coimbra, better known as Zico,Brazil's 62-year-old former star striker who also played forUdinese and had a previous stint as the country's sportsminister ("Why not?", Zico wrote on Facebook, "my whole lifehas always orbited around football"); and Chung Mong-joon, thepresident of South Korea's automobile giant Hyundai, one ofFIFA's major

(AGI) Rome, June 3 - FIFA has opened the post-Blatter era insearch of his successor. The day after the FIFA presidentannounced his resignation, even though he intends to remain inoffice until the end of the year, new candidacies have beenproposed: Arthur Antunes Coimbra, better known as Zico,Brazil's 62-year-old former star striker who also played forUdinese and had a previous stint as the country's sportsminister ("Why not?", Zico wrote on Facebook, "my whole lifehas always orbited around football"); and Chung Mong-joon, thepresident of South Korea's automobile giant Hyundai, one ofFIFA's major sponsors, who said he would "carefully evaluate"the possibility of standing for president, in agreement withthe European members. In the meantime, UEFA has postponedthe meeting scheduled this weekend in Berlin. "It is wiser totake time to evaluate the situation in order to have a commonstand," said UEFA President, Michel Platini. U.S. Secretaryof Justice, Loretta Lynch, preferred not to comment on newsleaks reporting that Blatter is under investigation in theUnited States. "This is an ongoing matter, it is an open case,and so we will now be speaking through the courts," Lynch saidin a press conference in Riga. The investigation will notstop here: at the request of the U.S. authorities, Interpol hasissued international arrest warrants for two former FIFAexecutives and four managers. Interpol, the internationalorganisation promoting cooperation between police forces,launched the so-called "red alert" for the followingindividuals: the former president of CONCACAF, Jack Warner; theformer president of CONMEBOL South America, Nicolas Leoz; threemanagers in the sponsorship and media sectors, AlejandroBurzaco, Hugo Jinkis and Mariano Jinkis; and Brazil's Jose'Margulies, the chief of two offshore companies dealing in TVrights. While the European Commission continues to callfor "a radical change" inside FIFA, some comments have alsobeen made by Italy. Carlo Tavecchio, the president of theItalian Football Federation FIGC, abstained from criticisingBlatter and only said: "Not having voted to re-elect PresidentBlatter is no victory. Personally, I am very sorry about it.Not voting for him was a hard decision although, faced with asituation that lacked clarity, I just couldn't bring myself tovote for him blind-foldedly." . .