Italian-Israeli symposium on archaeology and agriculture

(AGI) Rome, Sept 30 - Both Italy and Israel hold pricelessarchaeological collections of incalculable historic, culturaland social importance, on which the foundations of Westerncivilisation are based. The theme of Expo 2015 is food and itscorollaries - cutting edge technologies used in developingagriculture and irrigation. A symposium involving Italy andIsrael is being held on Oct. 7 and 8 in the Israel Pavilion atExpo, an ideal setting, and will focus on identifying the mostancient roots of these technologies in Italian and Israeliculture. The symposium, which links archaeology to the modernday, has been

(AGI) Rome, Sept 30 - Both Italy and Israel hold pricelessarchaeological collections of incalculable historic, culturaland social importance, on which the foundations of Westerncivilisation are based. The theme of Expo 2015 is food and itscorollaries - cutting edge technologies used in developingagriculture and irrigation. A symposium involving Italy andIsrael is being held on Oct. 7 and 8 in the Israel Pavilion atExpo, an ideal setting, and will focus on identifying the mostancient roots of these technologies in Italian and Israeliculture. The symposium, which links archaeology to the modernday, has been organised by the Israeli Embassy in Rome and theArchaeology Department of the Italian Ministry of CulturalAssets and Activities, along with the Israel AntiquitiesAuthority, the Israeli National Tourist Office, the PolytechnicUniversity of Milan's Mantua department, the Shenkar College inTel Aviv, and the Lombardy Regional Archaeology Department. Anopening press conference will be held at midday local time onWednesday Oct. 7 in the Sala delle Colonne at Milan's municipalarchaeology department. The first part of the symposium willfollow at 2.45, dealing with the cooperation between thePolytechnic University of Milan and the Shenkar Institute inTel Aviv, geared to making the ancient city of Acre (Akko),which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, into a museum. Italianand Israeli experts will discuss the influence of agricultureon the formation of this Templar city and many other culturalsites in Italy and Israel. Thursday Oct. 8 will be devoted tothe subject of water, which is crucial to agriculturaldevelopment and particularly precious in an arid land likeIsrael, where the landscape still bears the ruins of the Romanacqueducts common to the Mediterranean region as a whole sincethe reign of Augustus. Constructions and artefacts aboundeverywhere. . .