Two months after attack, Charlie Hebdo divided over money

(AGI) Paris, Mar 20 - Two months after the attack on CharlieHebdo, tension returned to the French satirical weekly, dividedover the fate of the nearly 30 million euros received in thewake of the massacre. Eleven journalists have asked for allemployees to become equal shareholders in the magazine, arguingthat a more equitable division allows for greater"transparency". "The wider the control, the more decisions willbe taken collectively and that's better for everyone," wrotejournalist Laurent Leger, backed among others by leader writerPatrick Pelloux. Currently, Charlie Hebdo is 40 percent ownedby the parents of

(AGI) Paris, Mar 20 - Two months after the attack on CharlieHebdo, tension returned to the French satirical weekly, dividedover the fate of the nearly 30 million euros received in thewake of the massacre. Eleven journalists have asked for allemployees to become equal shareholders in the magazine, arguingthat a more equitable division allows for greater"transparency". "The wider the control, the more decisions willbe taken collectively and that's better for everyone," wrotejournalist Laurent Leger, backed among others by leader writerPatrick Pelloux. Currently, Charlie Hebdo is 40 percent ownedby the parents of Charb, the former director of the magazinewho was killed in the Jan. 7 attacks, 40 percent by cartoonistRiss, who is recovering in hospital from shoulder wounds and 20percent by joint manager Eric Portheault. Before theterrorist attack, Charlie Hebdo was teetering on the verge ofbankruptcy and was selling only around 30,000 copies a week.But a "survivors' issue" published a week after the attacksflew off the shelves and ended up selling seven million copiesand the magazine was inundated with donations. It is this newfound wealth that has sparked divisions. "All this money isdoing more harm than good," said a lawyer attorney representingthe magazine's management. "Our first thought has to be to geta paper out every Wednesday. Then we have tax issues toresolve, as donations are taxed at 60 percent," he continued."The donations are going to the victims' families. The proceedsfrom the sales are going into the magazine's coffers. They willbe used to create a foundation, notably to teach freedom ofexpression in schools." (AGI) .