Italian research in Denmark showcased at embassy

(AGI) Copenhagen, March 12 - Italian researchers are discussingthe state of research in Italy and Denmark in the historicalresidence of the Italian embassy in Copenhagen. Hundreds ofItalian researchers live and work in Denmark, attracted by thegenerous incentives available at universities, in business,study centres and private foundations. On the third day ofthe meeting, the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities of theUniversity of Copenhagen, Riber Hedetoft, highlighted theincrease in private sponsorship in his field. He also describedan ambitious programme to digitise Denmark's libraries. Thehead of department of the Niels Bohr Institute,

(AGI) Copenhagen, March 12 - Italian researchers are discussingthe state of research in Italy and Denmark in the historicalresidence of the Italian embassy in Copenhagen. Hundreds ofItalian researchers live and work in Denmark, attracted by thegenerous incentives available at universities, in business,study centres and private foundations. On the third day ofthe meeting, the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities of theUniversity of Copenhagen, Riber Hedetoft, highlighted theincrease in private sponsorship in his field. He also describedan ambitious programme to digitise Denmark's libraries. Thehead of department of the Niels Bohr Institute, KrarupFeidenhansl, looked back over more than a 100 years ofscientific cooperation between the two countries, emphasizingItalian contributions with researchers such as Enrico Fermi andFabiola Gianotti, and the many Italians who work at theEuropean Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator in Lund, insouthern Sweden. One of the speakers was the president ofthe National Agency for the Evaluation of Universities andResearch (ANVUR), Stefano Fantoni, who illustrated thecommitment and challenges of the Italian effort to encouragescientific research and evaluate its results. NeuroscientistGiacomo Rizzolatti, winner of the Danish Lundbeck foundation'sBrain Award in 2014 and of the Prince of Asturias prize in2011, illustrated the academic and human adventure of thediscovery of mirror neurons, which form the basis of empathy,at the University of Parma. The meeting was attended byrepresentatives of the most important Italian companies in theScandinavian country, by Italians active in the field ofpromotion and internationalisation including the Italian TradeCommission (ICE). Also present were the science attache' inStockholm, the military attache' in Berlin, the Italian-DanishChamber of Commerce and the Italian Cultural Institute inCopenhagen. . .