'Italy you don't expect' book launched in Russia

(AGI) Moscow, May 22 - The Russian edition of the book"L'Italia che non ti aspetti" (The Italy you don't expect) waspresented at the Italian Embassy in Moscow. The authorsAngelino Lonardi and Antonio Cianci, use concrete examples totalk about an Italy of excellence and successful people, justlike other EU states, debunking the stereotype of the "sick manof Europe". For a foreign audience, the translation of thevolume is a chance to discover a completely different countryto the one they have heard about. Through successful people andstories of entrepreneurship, of science and art the

(AGI) Moscow, May 22 - The Russian edition of the book"L'Italia che non ti aspetti" (The Italy you don't expect) waspresented at the Italian Embassy in Moscow. The authorsAngelino Lonardi and Antonio Cianci, use concrete examples totalk about an Italy of excellence and successful people, justlike other EU states, debunking the stereotype of the "sick manof Europe". For a foreign audience, the translation of thevolume is a chance to discover a completely different countryto the one they have heard about. Through successful people andstories of entrepreneurship, of science and art the bookoutlines the development of a nation, whose discoveries haveinfluenced the world's economy and culture. These includepeople such as Battista Pirelli, the tyre magnate, EnricoForlanini, the inventor of the first helicopter, AmedeoGiannini, the founder of the Bank of America, which has nowacquired Merrill Lynch and is one of the largest banks in theworld, or Rocco Petrone, the head of the Apollo mission thatput the first man on the moon. "This book reminds us oftheir abilities," said Ambassador Cesare Maria Ragaglini,speaking at the event attended by both authors and the chairmanof the board of directors of Banca Intesa and of the "ConoscereEurasia" (Knowing Eurasia) foundation, Antonio Fallico. "InRussia it is very easy to hear people speak well of Italy,often seen as a model to emulate," said Mr Fallico, who alsowrote the preface to the book. "If, therefore, the way in whichItaly is represented veers towards the negative, the guiltprobably lies with the Italians first and foremost, who havelong been champions at denigrating their own country," hecontinued. In Russia, where there is a deep-rooted "positiveprejudice" about Italy, the public has discovered, also with acertain amusement, that the two peoples are very similar inthis way. Indeed, the famous writer Aleksandr Pushkin said:"the Russians can argue for hours about how things don't workin their country, but will never allow anyone else to." (AGI) . .