CIA torture condemned around the world

(AGI) Rome, Dec 10 - Details of enhanced interrogationtechniques used by the CIA have emerged after a publication bythe Senate Intelligence Committee of its report into thetorture of detainees following 9/11. The accusations are notnew, but this is the first time Congress has officiallyadmitted to the CIA's trickery and brutality, which U.S.President Barack Obama himself has described as beingincompatible with American values. Afghan President AshrafGhani said the CIA had violated human rights and U.S. law.Should anyone try to bring the agents implicated to trial, theprosecution services in Poland charged with

(AGI) Rome, Dec 10 - Details of enhanced interrogationtechniques used by the CIA have emerged after a publication bythe Senate Intelligence Committee of its report into thetorture of detainees following 9/11. The accusations are notnew, but this is the first time Congress has officiallyadmitted to the CIA's trickery and brutality, which U.S.President Barack Obama himself has described as beingincompatible with American values. Afghan President AshrafGhani said the CIA had violated human rights and U.S. law.Should anyone try to bring the agents implicated to trial, theprosecution services in Poland charged with investigating theexistence of secret CIA prisons there has let it be known thatit will request the report on the torture meted out to Al Qaedasuspects from the American Senate. Aleksander Kwasniewski,Socialist president during the period in which the CIA made useof secret detention centres in Poland, has admitted that thegovernment had an intelligence collaboration agreement with itsAmerican counterpart ("although no reference was made totorture"), which enabled the U.S. secret service to make use ofthe restricted military area of Kiejkut, near Szczytno. He saidthat his government was never informed of the details of whathappened there, and was keen to find out whether the tortureswere administered for the satisfaction of the torturers aloneor for obtaining information that would save other human lives.The Chinese and North Korean governments, both frequentlyaccused of human rights violations by non-governmentalorganisations (NGOs), lost no time in trying to push the U.S.into a corner, with Beijing urging the U.S. to clean up its ownbackyard. Pyongyang has called on the United Nations SecurityCouncil, which will be looking at the human rights situation inNorth Korea within the next few days, to condemn the U.S. InEurope, too, indignation was flowing. Frank Walter Steinmeier,the German Foreign Minister, said that what was then consideredright, and done in the fight against Islamic terrorism, wasunacceptable and a serious mistake. David Nevin, the lawyer forKhalid Sheikh Mohammed, the brains behind the 9/11 attacks, hasmeanwhile asked that his client be spared the death penalty,saying that following 183 fake executions, this would be acruel and unusual punishment. (AGI) . .