Apple deleted music not downloaded to iPods from iTunes

(AGI) New York, Dec. 6 - Three years after his death, Applefounder Steve Jobs reappeared on a video to give a posthumoustestimony in a trial against the Cupertino-based company inOakland, California, following a class action suit filed 10years ago. The complaint concerned the impossibility to useiPods to reproduce music downloaded from online stores otherthan iTunes, thus obliging iPod owners to only download musicfrom its iTunes stores from 2006 to 2009. Plaintiffs in theclass action suit claim a compensation of 350 million dollars(which the judge can triple) and intend to use the

(AGI) New York, Dec. 6 - Three years after his death, Applefounder Steve Jobs reappeared on a video to give a posthumoustestimony in a trial against the Cupertino-based company inOakland, California, following a class action suit filed 10years ago. The complaint concerned the impossibility to useiPods to reproduce music downloaded from online stores otherthan iTunes, thus obliging iPod owners to only download musicfrom its iTunes stores from 2006 to 2009. Plaintiffs in theclass action suit claim a compensation of 350 million dollars(which the judge can triple) and intend to use the video, whichwas recorded by Jobs shortly before he died, together withseveral e-mails and text messages sent by the Apple mastermind,as evidence of his deliberate intention to protect the monopolyof Apple's iPods by preventing the purchase of music notdownloaded from iTunes. In some excerpts of the video publishedon The Verge website, Jobs argues that Apple was very concernedover possible retaliatory measures by recording companies ifmusic purchased in iTunes and downloaded to an iPod were thencopied onto somebody else's computer. "We went to great painsto make sure that people couldn't hack into our digital rightsmanagement system because if they could, we would get nastyemails from the labels threatening us that they were going toyank the license", Jobs said. According to Jobs, "lots ofhackers" were trying to break into the system, and as a result,Apple had to be constantly "revving the iTunes and iPodsoftware, closing any holes that might be in it, or anyproblems it might have". If these changes meant thatcompetitors became locked out, then they were only "collateraldamage," he said. (AGI) . .